Corner Brook Mountie reflects on emotional funeral in Moncton

Gary
Gary Kean
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An RCMP officer tries to contain his emotions at the RCMP regimental funeral on Tuesday for the three Mountie who were gunned down in Moncton last week.

From anger and sadness over the senseless killings, to pride and a reaffirmed resolve to keep people safe, Cpl. John Power ran the gamut of emotions as he attended the funeral for three slain RCMP officers in Moncton Tuesday.

Power, an officer stationed at the Corner Brook detachment, was among the 19 RCMP officers who represented Newfoundland and Labrador at the ceremony to remember constables Fabrice Georges Gevaudan, Douglas James Larche and Dave Joseph Ross.

The three were shot by a lone gunman, who wounded two other RCMP officers before an intensive manhunt resulted in him being taken into custody last week.

“It was gut-wrenching, it really was,” Power said moments after leaving the memorial, which was held at the Moncton Coliseum.

Around 7,000 people, mostly police officers and first responders from across the country, joined the grieving families and a selection of dignitaries for the funeral.

“It was amazing and, at the same time, it was very sad, as you can imagine,” reflected Power.

A police officer for 20 years, Power served seven years in Moncton before coming to Newfoundland and Labrador in 2000.

The hardest part for Power was to see the reactions of the families of the three officers. Like them, the Moncton region will need a lot more time to come to terms with what happened.

“You feel the sadness of the families, but you also feel the anger and the rage that one individual could ruin so many lives in a completely senseless act that has no reason behind it,” said Power, adding that those sentiments were echoed by those who spoke at the funeral.

If there are any lessons to be learned from the tragedy, Power hopes they are positive ones.

“This has done nothing but strengthen my resolve to continue within the RCMP,” said Power. “I have a renewed sense of pride. You don’t think about it on a daily basis, but something like this really drives home what we do and how we do it.”

Like the tragedy in Mayerthorpe, Alta. — where four RCMP officers were gunned down in 2005 — the sting of losing the officers in Moncton will take a long time to dull and likely will never go away.

Power will be back in Corner Brook to resume his duties Thursday. He hopes it never happens anywhere again, but he knows if this could happen in Moncton, or Mayerthorpe, then it could happen anywhere.

“That’s unfortunate, but that’s the society we live in in this day and age,” he said. “I personally think our values system seems to be degrading somewhat and it has really created some of these issues that have been coming forward recently. There is good and bad in every society. Unfortunately, it had to reveal itself in this way.”

Organizations: RCMP

Geographic location: Moncton, Corner Brook, Newfoundland and Labrador

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  • Carol Ann
    June 11, 2014 - 12:22

    It's ok to cry Cpl Power.....the whole country cried along with you and others during this shocking and sad time. Being strong is not about holding it in....being strong is about having courage and a backbone. Not being afraid to let it all out....I looked at this picture many times on the national news websites and cried myself before looking in the local news to read that you are one of ours....this picture will forever be etched in my memory and to you and all who serve and protect our towns and country thank you for your service and stay safe.

  • Carol Ann
    June 11, 2014 - 12:21

    It's ok to cry Cpl Power.....the whole country cried along with you and others during this shocking and sad time. Being strong is not about holding it in....being strong is about having courage and a backbone. Not being afraid to let it all out....I looked at this picture many times on the national news websites and cried myself before looking in the local news to read that you are one of ours....this picture will forever be etched in my memory and to you and all who serve and protect our towns and country thank you for your service and stay safe.

  • Carol Ann
    June 11, 2014 - 12:20

    It's ok to cry Cpl Power.....the whole country cried along with you and others during this shocking and sad time. Being strong is not about holding it in....being strong is about having courage and a backbone. Not being afraid to let it all out....I looked at this picture many times on the national news websites and cried myself before looking in the local news to read that you are one of ours....this picture will forever be etched in my memory and to you and all who serve and protect our towns and country thank you for your service and stay safe.

  • Lorraine Tauson
    June 11, 2014 - 08:17

    I am so very sorry at the loss of these three brave mounties. These men should still be alive today. I strongly believe in capital punishment. Since we do not have capital punishment in Canada then I want the murderer to be put in to prison for life and I mean life as in till the day he dies in prison. Not this 25 year nonsense. God bless the three mounties: Fabrice Georges Gevaudan; Douglas James Larche; Dave Joesph Ross. May you be at peace in our Lord Jesus heaven. God bless the family and friends left behind. These men were truly very brave.

  • Henry
    June 11, 2014 - 07:17

    A very tragic event. Condolences to the families and the RCMP the greatest police force in the world... We are so lucky to have them.

  • Trisha
    June 11, 2014 - 07:11

    My heart goes out to the families, friends, RCMP and to a special partner to one of the fallen his dog. I hope if anything people can see what video games, and possibly drugs are doing to our society. When people are sitting every day playing games of rage what is it doing to their brain? Especially children. Can some tell the difference between what is and is not real. Salute our RCMP, stop using them as jokes and saying bad things about them where kids are. They listen with open ears and hang on to every word you say. People gotta learn from this. Our society is vulnerable, we most definitely shouldn't take it for granted. Watch what you say and let your children do. Their little minds can't process violence like you think. It's damaging even to some adults it's damaging!

    • Phyllis
      June 11, 2014 - 13:52

      "I hope if anything people can see what video games, and possibly drugs are doing to our society. When people are sitting every day playing games of rage what is it doing to their brain?" Millions and millions of people have played video games and don't commit murder. This guy shot those policemen because he was A. Suffering from pre-existing mental illness and B. A vehement pro-gun, anti-government ideologue who had a whole lot of hate propaganda and political BS to encourage him. Lots of folks are mentally ill, lots of folks are political extremists. On their own, they're benign. However, when those two factors mix, the combination is lethal. While we're at it: why did murders happen before video games were invented? Cops and robbers? Cowboys and indians, maybe? Who/what else can we blame this on?