Maryland and N.L. become friends

James
James McLeod
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Minister struggles to explain practical benefits of signed agreement

Newfoundland and Labrador is now officially friends with Maryland for the next two years.
But Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dan Crummell and Maryland Secretary of State John McDonough had a hard time explaining exactly what that means, or how it will benefit the people of Newfoundland and Labrador, or the people of Maryland.

Intergovernmental Affairs Minister Dan Crummell and John McDonough, Secretary of State for Maryland, sign a friendship agreement Monday morning at Confederation Building. — Photo by James McLeod/The Telegram

Crummell assured reporters that the friendship agreement is, in fact, very important.

“We don’t want to be signing agreements for the sake of signing agreements,” he said. “We want to see some concrete things happen from these agreements.”

This isn’t the first time the Newfoundland and Labrador government has done this sort of thing.

In 2008, the province signed a memorandum of understanding (MOU) with Iceland. Now, six years later, Crummell was asked what kind of practical benefits had materialized as a result of that MOU.

Crummell said he didn’t know, because he’s relatively new as intergovernmental affairs minister.

When a reporter asked about practical benefits of the MOU signed between Newfoundland and Labrador and Ireland back in 2005, Crummell said he didn’t know what had come of that one either.

“I’m just new in this portfolio. It’s not something that I would be able to speak directly to,” he said. “I don’t think we quite got to our briefings with intergovernmental affairs yet. I should have the briefings in the next few days.”

Crummell was shuffled into the portfolio 11 days before the Monday morning news conference.

Trying to assess the value of the friendship agreement, another reporter took a different tack.

“Would your state be interested in cheap hydro power?” the reporter asked McDonough.

Maryland is farther away than New York and Boston — two cities usually mentioned when talking about Muskrat Falls excess power sales — but McDonough said it’s certainly something Maryland would consider.

“I think every state is interested in cheap hydro power,” he said.

For the most part, Crummell and McDonough wanted to talk about history.

Sir George Calvert, the first lord of Baltimore, established a colony in Ferryland in 1621. He also founded the colony at Maryland.

McDonough also pointed out that both jurisdictions have TV shows being filmed there; following the news conference, he said he was going to see the “Republic of Doyle” set.

The HBO show “Veep” and the Netflix series “House of Cards” are both filmed in Maryland.

“Our two jurisdictions probably have similar experience dealing with that industry in terms of the economics of it and tax credits,” he said.

Unless the two governments choose to renew the agreement, Newfoundland and Labrador and Maryland could stop being friends in two years.

 

jmcleod@thetelegram.com

Twitter: TelegramJames

Geographic location: Maryland, Newfoundland and Labrador, Iceland Ireland New York Boston Baltimore Ferryland

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  • Don II
    August 04, 2014 - 13:20

    I trust that the Editor of the Compass will publish this comment and my previous comments in response to the comments of Bill Gilbert, so that people following this discussion are indeed clear that John Guy, in his letter of 1610, never stated that he landed at a place called Cupids or Cupids Cove , John Guy never stated that the Sea Forest Plantation was located in Cupids and John Guy never stated that the ponds he described in his letter of 1611 were situated in Cupids. It is clear that any references to Cupids being the site of where John Guy landed and established a Colony was never stated by John Guy and must therefore be based on a fictional account, wrong conclusions or misinterpretation of history created and promoted as historical fact by parties other than John Guy. It should also be noted that despite the fact that no place called the Cupids Cove Plantation is mentioned in the Historical Record of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador and that no historical notoriety or significance is ever attributed to any place called the Cupids Cove Plantation, that the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador designated the site in Cupids as the Cupids Cove Plantation Provincial Historic Site and created a Provincial Historical Site for a place which is NEVER mentioned in the historical record of the Province!

  • Don II
    August 02, 2014 - 12:49

    I note that Bill Gilbert's very unconvincing contrary comments have been repeated and published multiple times in this forum. I must respectfully respond in the public interest that repeated contrary commentary will not change the following facts: 1. John Guy stated in his letter of October 6, 1610 that he landed at Cupers Cove...."which is a branch of {Sammon} Salmon Cove." 2. John Guy stated in his letter that Cupers Cove was a branch of and located near to {Sammon} Salmon Cove. 3. The Charter of the Colony of Avalon states that the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon extended to: "..a Certain little bay commonly called Salmon Cove." 4. The Charter of the Colony of Avalon states that the Sea Forest Plantation was located near to Salmon Cove (now Avondale). 5. Historic documents exist which show that the Cupers Cove Plantation was located inside the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon and that the ownership and control of the Cupers Cove Plantation was acquired by Sir George Calvert. 6. Governor Edward Wynne of the Colony of Avalon in his letter dated August 17, 1622 that was written in Ferryland to Sir George Calvert referred to:"...Our Northern Plantation." 7. That 17th century and early 18th century maps which were made by famous explorers and cartographers clearly show Salmon Cove located near where the town of Avondale is now. 8. It is clear that the 17th century Salmon Cove referred to in John Guy's letter and in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon was not the same Salmon Cove that is located near to Cupids today. 9. It is clear that Salmon Cove (now Avondale) was located near to both the Cupers Cove Plantation and the Sea Forest Plantation. 10. It is clear that the Salmon Cove located near Cupids now was not was not named Salmon Cove in 1610. 11. It is clear that the Salmon Cove located near Cupids did not appear on 17th century and early 18th century maps. 12. It is clear that the Salmon Cove located near Cupids today was not the same Salmon Cove that was referred to by John Guy and by the Charter of the Colony of Avalon. 13. John Guy never stated that he landed at Cupids Cove. 14. John Guy never stated that the ponds he mentioned in his letter were located in Cupids.15. It is clear that the John Guy letter dated October 6, 1610 and the Charter of the Colony of Avalon both clearly refer to the same Salmon Cove (now Avondale). 16. It is clear that the town of Cupids and the Salmon Cove near Cupids were never located inside the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon, were never located near to the Sea Forest Plantation and were never located near to the Cupers Cove Plantation. 17. It is clear that Cupids Cove was never located near to the real location of Cupers Cove. 18. It is clear that Cupers Cove was located near to Salmon Cove(now Avondale). 19. It is clear that in 1610 that Cupids Cove and Cupers Cove were two separate places located miles apart. 20. It is clear that the Sea Forest Plantation was never located in the town of Cupids. 21. It is clear that the Cupers Cove Plantation was never located in the town of Cupids. 22. Both John Guy and Henry Crout wrote that they were living at Cupers Cove and never made any references to any place called Cupids or Cupids Cove in their letters and journals. 23. It is clear that the Historic Record of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador contains no reference to any place called the Cupids Cove Plantation and does not make any attribution to any place called the Cupids Cove Plantation as being established by John Guy. 24. It appears that the historical significance which has been attributed to the town of Cupids is not based on a correct interpretation of known historical facts. 25. The town of Cupids does have a proud historical past as one of the early fishing communities which includes a history of the exploits and experiences of a number of historically interesting former residents and several significant historical events. 26. It is clear that John Guy was not the founder of Cupids Cove and did not establish either the Cupers Cove Plantation, the Sea Forest Plantation or the fictional Cupids Cove Plantation in Cupids. 27. The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador should not have attributed any historical significance to the town of Cupids as being the purported location of the Cupers Cove Plantation or provided any credence to claims that Cupids is the location of the First English Settlement in Canada. 28. The Government of Newfoundland and Labrador should not have expropriated privately owned property in Cupids in order to create and designate the fictional Cupids Cove Plantation as a Provincial Historic Site. 29. The fictional Cupids Cove Plantation is never referred to in the Historical Record of the Province and is never recorded as being in existence in the 17th century and is never attributed as being established by John Guy in 1610! It is clear that no other Province or State in North America would intentionally create an official Provincial or State Historic Site to commemorate a purported historic place which did not exist and which is NEVER mentioned or referred to in the Historical Record of that Province or State!

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:26

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

    • Don II
      July 31, 2014 - 13:04

      I appreciate that The Compass provides this informative forum for respectful discussion, constructive debate and allows for the clarification of issues. I must respectfully disagree with Bill Gilbert's comments regarding the history and purported location of the Cupers Cove Plantation and the purported history of the town of Cupids as follows: In his comments regarding the description of the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon, Bill Gilbert states: "...a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception." Mr. Gilbert appears to have omitted and neglected to quote the Charter of the Colony of Avalon description of its boundaries in complete and unedited detail especially regarding the location of Cupers Cove and Salmon Cove as described in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon and in John Guy's letter dated October 6, 1610. In his letter of October 6, 1610 John Guy states: "..we arrived (God be praised) all in safety in the bay of Conception, in Newfoundland, [in the] harbour here called {Cuperres} Cupers Cove; which is a branch of {Sammon} Salmon Cove." It should be noted that the Charter of the Colony of Avalon states: "..a Certain little bay commonly called Salmon Cove lying on the south side of the Bay of Conception." The Charter of the Colony of Avalon directly identifies Salmon Cove and the adjacent lands of the "Sea Forest" Plantation owned by John Guy as being included in the prescribed boundaries of the lands of the Colony of Avalon. It is clear from the written descriptions contained in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon and in John Guy's letter of October 6, 1610 and from other historical documents, letters and maps that the large tract of land encompassed by the Charter of the Colony of Avalon included Salmon Cove (now Avondale) but did not include or extend anywhere near to Cupids or to the other Salmon Cove (formerly Bay de Grave) which now exists near to the town of Cupids. John Guy stated specifically that he landed at Cupers Cove and made no reference to landing at any place called Cupids Cove. It is absolutely clear from the historic record that the Salmon Cove located near the town of Cupids today is not the Salmon Cove referred to in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon and that the Salmon Cove located near Cupids is not the Salmon Cove which John Guy referred to in his letter dated October 6, 1610 ! The Salmon Cove that is referred to in both the Charter of the Colony of Avalon and in John Guy's letter of October 6, 1610 and which is shown on numerous 17th century maps was located near where the town of Avondale is now. It is the Salmon Cove (now Avondale) which was located near to both John Guy's own land known as the Sea Forest Plantation and near to the Cupers Cove Plantation where John Guy was the Governor. The historical documentary evidence clearly establishes that the Sea Forest Plantation, the Cupers Cove Plantation and the Salmon Cove referred to in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon and in John Guy's letter of October 6, 1610 were all located near to where the town of Avondale is now and were never located in or near to the the town of Cupids. It is clear from the Charter of the Colony of Avalon, John Guy's letter of October 6, 1610 and from other historical letters, documents and numerous maps that the town of Cupids and the Salmon Cove near to Cupids were never part of the Cupers Cove Plantation or the Sea Forest Plantation.The references to "our Northern Plantation" and ".and placed sundry Governors there , as Captain Wynne, Captain Mason and Sir Arthur Aston.." contained in the documents of Governor Wynne and Cecil Calvert show that the ownership and control of the Cupers Cove Plantation, while Captain John Mason was Governor, was transferred from the London & Bristol Company to the ownership and control of Sir George Calvert. It is clear that the Cupers Cove Plantation was originally located near Salmon Cove (now Avondale) which was land formerly owned by the London & Bristol Company that was acquired by Sir George Calvert and became included inside the boundaries of the large tract of land described in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon. It is clear that in 1610, Cupers Cove and Cupids Cove were separate and distinct places located miles apart from each other. The town of Cupids also purports to be the location of a fictional historic place named the Cupids Cove Plantation. However, the fictional Cupids Cove Plantation is never mentioned in the historical record of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Inexplicably, the fact that the Cupids Cove Plantation is never mentioned anywhere in the historical record of the Province did not deter or prevent the Government of Newfoundland and Labrador from expropriating privately owned land to create an official Provincial Historic Site in Cupids to commemorate the fictional Cupids Cove Plantation which has no recorded historical authentication. All of the propaganda, local folklore, myths, misleading claims, omissions from and misinterpretations of the documents in the historical record which have helped create the highly fictionalized history of the town of Cupids should be completely refuted, discounted, dismissed and replaced with an objective, properly academic and correct interpretation of the historical record which will show that the town of Cupids was never the authentic location of the Cupers Cove Plantation, Sea Forest Plantation, First English Settlement in Canada or even the fictional Cupids Cove Plantation!

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:19

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

    • Don II
      July 31, 2014 - 09:12

      I trust that the Editor of The Compass will permit me to respond to Bill Gilbert's very unconvincing arguments. Mr. Gilbert states that: "Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove Colony are not the same place." Despite the fact that Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove Plantation (Colony)are not the same place, why is the main street through the town of Cupids named Sea Forest Drive? It is apparent that someone has been attempting to lead people into believing that the Sea Forest Plantation owned by John Guy was located in Cupids and was situated near to the Cupers Cove Plantation which was established by John Guy in 1610. It appears that the public has also been led to believe that the town of Cupids is where the Cupers Cove Plantation was located. Any claim that the Cupers Cove Plantation was located in Cupids is simply not a proven fact! All of the 17th century maps that I have researched, including the John Thornton map, all show Salmon Cove in the 1600's as being located near where the town of Avondale is located today. The Charter of the Colony of Avalon boundaries refer to Salmon Cove as being one of the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. The boundaries of the Colony of Avalon did not extend to anywhere near to Cupids or to the other Salmon Cove located near Cupids today. The Charter of the Colony of Avalon shows that John Guy's personal Grant of land was located near to Salmon Cove(now Avondale) and not anywhere near Cupids. Logic and common sense dictates that John Guy would have acquired his own Grant of land near to Salmon Cove (now Avondale) due to its close proximity to the Cupers Cove Plantation where he was the Governor. It would be impractical and make no sense during the days of hard travel by foot, horseback or by ship for John Guy, as the at the Governor of the Cupers Cove Plantation to have to commute by walking, riding or by ship to his own land if his own land was located many miles away from his Governor duties at Cupers Cove. The location of where John Guy chose to acquire his own land is clearly indicative of the close proximity of his personal Grant of land to the Cupers Cove Plantation where he was the Governor. The statement by John Guy regarding the location of Cupers Cove that: "This harbour is three leagues distance from Colliers Bay to the Northeastward..." should be properly interpreted to mean that Colliers Bay was three leagues to the Northeastward from Cupers Cove which would place the location of Cupers Cove closer to Holyrood and not in the direction of Cupids at all. The Henry Crout reference to the "Spectacles" was in plural which means he was talking about two heads of land and not one as is the case of the singular Spectacle Head in Cupids. The Henry Crout reference to Salmon Cove could only have been to the Salmon Cove which is now known as Avondale as all of the 17th century maps show Salmon Cove located near where Avondale is now and show the bay near Cupids as being called "Bay de Grave" not Salmon Cove. The reference by John Guy to the land at Cupers Cove being fruitful, deep and without rocks and the trees as being large could definitely not be a reference to the shallow rocky soil and sparse trees in that existed in Cupids in 1610 or now. It is well known that the soil in the area between Avondale and Holyrood is rich and good for growing large quantities of potatoes and other root crops. It appears that Cupids has never had such a good agricultural distinction. The references to Cupids by Bartholomew Pearson and Sir William Alexander merely confirm the existence of Cupids which, as the documents, maps and letters show, was a separate place from Cupers Cove. As the Cupers Cove Plantation was well known and in existence in 1613, the fact that Bartholomew Pearson referred to Cupids and not to Cupers Cove shows that he was not talking about the the separate Cupers Cove Plantation which was located many miles from Cupids. Interestingly, the site in the town of Cupids was designated as the Cupids Cove Plantation Provincial Historic Site by the Government of Newfoundland despite the fact that it appears that no place called the Cupids Cove Plantation is ever mentioned anywhere in the entire historical record of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador. Why did the Government designate a Provincial Historic Site to commemorate a place which is never mentioned in the historical record of the Province of Newfoundland and Labrador? It appears that there are many questions regarding the real location of the Cupers Cove Plantation but it is clear that the Cupers Cove Plantation was never located in the town of Cupids.

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:10

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:09

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:05

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:04

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 13:01

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • Bill Gilbert
    July 30, 2014 - 12:55

    Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • Bill McCarthy
    July 29, 2014 - 22:04

    As a Marylander who has twice enjoyed Newfoundland's hospitality, I would love to share some steamed crabs and beer with any unofficial members of the Newfoundland junket here in the land of pleasant living.

  • Llewellyn
    July 29, 2014 - 12:17

    I will happily volunteer to go spend the winter in Maryland instead of here. This will give the friendship significance as I can write about my happy winter in the local paper. Thanks.

    • Don II
      July 29, 2014 - 15:34

      Llewellyn, Sir George Calvert had the same opinion as you do about the long cold winters in Newfoundland. Daniel Powell had told George Calvert in 1622 that Ferryland had a reputation of being the coldest place on the island of Newfoundland. On August 19, 1629, Sir George Calvert wrote a letter to King Charles I in which Calvert informed the King that: "I have found, by to dear bought experience, which other men for their private interests always concealed from me, that from mid October to mid May there is a sad face of winter upon all this land, both sea and land so frozen for the greatest part of the time as they are not penetrable, no plant or vegetable thing appearing out of the earth until it be about the middle of May, nor fish in the sea, besides the air so intolerable cold as it is hardly to be endured." Based on the content of his letter to King Charles I, there should be no wondering why Sir George Calvert had planned before his death to leave the Colony of Avalon in Newfoundland and establish another Colony in a much warmer place like Maryland.

    • Don II
      July 30, 2014 - 08:37

      Llewellyn, it appears that your opinion of winters in Newfoundland was shared by Sir George Calvert in his letter of August 19, 1629 to King Charles I when he stated: "...from mid October to mid May there is a sad face of winter upon all this land, both sea and land so frozen for the greatest part of the time as they are not penetrable, no plant or vegetable thing appearing out of the earth until it be about the beginning of May, nor fish in the sea, besides the air so intolerable cold as it is hardly to be endured." Based on his opinion of winter in Newfoundland, it is not surprising that Sir George Calvert was willing to leave Ferryland in order to establish a new Colony in the warmer climate of Maryland.

  • Don II
    July 29, 2014 - 08:49

    It appears that a partnership agreement with the State of Maryland is part of the Government of Newfoundland planning for a big 400 th anniversary celebration of the founding of the Colony of Avalon which will be coming in 2021. This article states that: "Sir George Calvert, the first Lord Baltimore, established a colony in Ferryland in 1621. He also founded the colony at Maryland." As usual, the historical backgrounder information that the Government of Newfoundland gives to the media is somewhat inaccurate. While Sir George Calvert did arrange with the British King for the Granting of land for a colony in Maryland, it was not until two months after his death, in April 1632, that the Charter of Maryland received the Royal Seal. It was George Calvert's son Cecil, the second Lord Baltimore, who inherited his father's properties in North America, who actually was the Governor of the Colony of Maryland. The Colony of Avalon contained a much larger area of land than just the area around Ferryland. The land contained in the Charter of the Colony of Avalon extended from Ferryland to Petit Harbour across the peninsula to Salmon Cove (now Avondale) to Placentia and along the coastline back to Ferryland. Historical documents and maps show that the Cupers Cove Colony was located near Avondale which was located inside the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. In a letter dated August 17, 1622 to Sir George Calvert, the Colony of Avalon Governor Edward Wynne stated: "...the large breed of cattle to our Northern plantation..." The Wynne letter refers to the only other Plantation which was located within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon to the North of Ferryland in 1622 which was the Cupers Cove Plantation. It was the Cupers Cove Plantation near Avondale to which Governor Wynne referred to as "our Northern Plantation". In a deposition regarding the Colony of Avalon obtained from Cecil Calvert, he stated: "Sir George Calvert...made forts for their, and the Fishermen's defense, and placed sundry Governors there, as Captain Wynne, Captain Mason and Sir Arthur Aston." The deposition of Cecil Calvert shows that Captain John Mason was under the direct control of George Calvert, the owner of the Colony of Avalon while Mason was the Governor of the Cupers Cove Plantation. Although the land was originally owned by the London & Bristol Company, the Cupers Cove Plantation was located near Avondale which was located inside the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon and was subject to the control of Sir George Calvert. The historical documents show that the town of Cupids was never located inside the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. Hopefully, the Government of Newfoundland will have its historical facts confirmed and will not make the mistakes regarding the Colony of Avalon that it made when it incorrectly attributed the location of the Cupers Cove Plantation as being within the town of Cupids.

    • Don II
      July 29, 2014 - 09:20

      I forgot to mention that "Petit Harbour" is now known as Petty Harbour.

    • Bill Gilbert
      July 30, 2014 - 12:35

      Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

    • Bill Gilbert
      July 30, 2014 - 12:52

      Just so people are clear on this, the Charter of Avalon doesn't say that the Cupers Cove (or Cupids Cove) colony was within the boundaries of the Colony of Avalon. What it actually says is that the northern boundary of the Colony of Avalon runs from Petit Harbour (or Petty Harbour) in the east, west along the southern boundary of "the colony of St. Johns" as far as "a certain little bay lying on the southside of the Bay of Conception" and then extends south along the south side of Conception Bay "until the bottom where it meets with the lands of John Guy, Citizen of Bristol, named Sea Forest." A river flows into the sea at the bottom of Conception Bay and the boundary between The Colony of Avalon and Sea Forest runs south along this river for six miles. The Charter of Avalon is published in Gillian Cell's "Newfoundland Discovered" on pages 250-253 in case anyone would like to have a look. Contrary to what some people believe, Sea Forest and the Cupers Cove colony are not the same place. This is a mistake that was made by Prowse in his History of Newfoundland, first published in 1895, and the mistake is still sometimes repeated today. Sea Forest was actually a private grant of land given to John Guy by The Newfoundland Company (the company that set up the Cupers Cove Colony and that originally had been granted the whole island of Newfoundland) in exchange for services rendered. As Gillian Cell points out in "English Enterprise in Newfoundland" (page 71), "Before his death in 1629 [Guy] received a lot in Newfoundland, which he called Seaforest and which he bequeathed to his sons." In "Newfoundland Discovered" (footnote, page 251), Cell says that "Despite his break with the [Newfoundland] company, John Guy did receive a grant of land at the bottom of Conception Bay which he bequeathed to his sons." The documents and maps are quite clear about where Cupers Cove is actually located. In his first letter, written on 6 October, 1610 John Guy states that the colony is located three leagues, or about nine miles, northeast of Colliers, as is Cupids. In his second letter, written in May 1611, Guy tells us that the colony is a short distance from a lake "two miles in length and the sixth part of a mile broad", a clear reference to Cupids Pond located near the bottom of Cupids Harbour. In his diary, kept at the colony between 1 September, 1612 and 13 May, 1613. Henry Crout tells us that the colony is just over the hill from Salmon Cove, as is Cupids; that the headland between the colony and Salmon Cove is called the Spectacles (today the headland between Cupids and Salmon Cove is called Spectacle Head); and that the colony is within easy walking distance of Salmon Cove, Brigus and Burnt Head, as is Cupids. Indeed, Burnt Head is now part of Cupids. It is also clear that Cupers Cove is just one variant of a number of spellings of the name for the colony that were current in the early 17th century. The earliest written reference to the colony as Cupids is contained in a letter written at the colony by Bartholomew Pearson in April 1613. And, of course, Sir William Alexander, says of Newfoundland in his book, "An Encouragement to Colonies", published in 1624, that "the first houses for habitation were built in Cupids Cove in the Bay of Conception, where people did dwell for sundry years together, and some, well satisfied both for pleasure and profit, are dwelling there still." In a period when spelling and pronunciation were not standardized, and Newfoundland was frequented by people who spoke a wide range of dialects and languages, it's no more surprising that the name of the colony should be spelled in different ways by different people than it is that Petty Harbour was sometime spelled "Petit Harbour", St. John's was sometimes spelled "St. Joans", or Ferryland was sometimes spelled "farriland" (That's how Richard Whitbourne spells it in a letter to Lord Falkland dated 27 February, 1626). Most 17th century maps show "Cupers Cove", "Cuperts Cove", "Coopers Cove", "Cupids Cove", or some other variant of the name where the town of Cupids stands today. Bill Gilbert Baccalieu Trail Heritage Corporation

  • John Q Public
    July 29, 2014 - 07:07

    There were probably a couple of staff people in Mr. Crummells department who worked on this press conference for a week to gather information and prepare briefing notes and make preparations.. There were probably a couple more people in the government communications department who worked a couple of days to prepare for the dud of press conference. The minister himself probably spent a week frolicking with Maryland visitors and spending tax dollars on sightseeing, food and entertainment. A conservative (pardon the word) estimate would be in the range of $7,500 to $10,000 and what did we get? We have a signed document that we are friends with Maryland for the next two years! What a terrible "Newfie" joke!!!!!!!

  • Maurice E. Adams
    July 29, 2014 - 06:28

    Quebec is getting an average of 3 cents per KWh for exported power (http://business.financialpost.com/2014/03/01/is-quebecs-electricity-business-model-broken/?__lsa=f12c-a82c ) .......... NL ratepayers will be paying around 20 cents per KWh for Muskrat's power . No doubt, government and Nalcor wants NL ratepayers (down the road) to build wind power (at high costs to NL ratepayers) so that it can get 3 cents per KWh from Maryland. .........We are being robbed blind by our own government and Nalcor.

  • Corporate Psycho
    July 29, 2014 - 04:49

    So what does Crummell know?

    • Muggins
      July 29, 2014 - 10:31

      Apparently not much... Maybe he needs to spend some time in the office learning his job. By the way... nice tan Dan.