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New scooter for Noah


A group of Grade 7 and 8 students at St. Francis School in Harbour Grace gave their classmate a gift he won’t soon forget.

Seventh grader Noah George is autistic. He enjoys hanging with his friends, playing and having fun. But one thing that Noah really loves to do is use his scooter.

Noah had no idea when the nine boys saw him using his old scooter two weeks ago near his home that they would decide to join together to replace the old toy.

The boys were hanging out after school one day, when they recognized Noah near his home.

“When we saw Noah, he was on his scooter,” Ethan Brushett told The Compass during a recent interview with the boys and their teacher, Judy McCarthy, at the school. “We could see it was getting older.”

They suggested they pool their money together and replace the scooter.

“When one of us came up with the idea, we were all in on it,” said Reilly Meadus, another classmate.

It wasn’t long before the boys collected over $100, and with the help of Reilly’s dad purchased a brand new scooter and helmet for Noah.

The gesture overwhelmed their teacher, but she didn’t quite know what the boys were planning initially. Two students came to her and told her the scooter was in rough shape.

“All I could think was, ‘Where are you going with this,’” McCarthy said.

That’s when they told her they bought the scooter and would like to give it to Noah in front of the school.

“I was just blown away and so impressed that this group of young men would get together and do this for Noah,” McCarthy said elatedly.

Noah was surprised at the generosity of his classmates.

“(I felt) really happy,” he said. “It felt good.”

 

  Positive news story

When asked why the boys decided to purchase a new scooter for Noah, their answer was wise beyond their years.

“We just wanted to do some good in the community,” Ryan Combden told The Compass.

It was never about the recognition, which the boys were obviously not used to. They were happy for someone to acknowledge the good deed, but not because they wanted a pat on the back.

The boys noted that news stories often involve sad situations, and in this case, they wanted to spread a little good news for a change. This was something positive.

“I think it really restores people’s faith in humanity,” Ethan Mercer said.

And Noah agreed.

“I think it’s kind of cool,” he said.

McCarthy is really proud of her students and believes they will be an inspiration to others that may want to do something nice for a classmate or friend.

All the boys agreed they want to keep doing good in their community and for those in need.

 

melissa.jenkins@tc.tc

Seventh grader Noah George is autistic. He enjoys hanging with his friends, playing and having fun. But one thing that Noah really loves to do is use his scooter.

Noah had no idea when the nine boys saw him using his old scooter two weeks ago near his home that they would decide to join together to replace the old toy.

The boys were hanging out after school one day, when they recognized Noah near his home.

“When we saw Noah, he was on his scooter,” Ethan Brushett told The Compass during a recent interview with the boys and their teacher, Judy McCarthy, at the school. “We could see it was getting older.”

They suggested they pool their money together and replace the scooter.

“When one of us came up with the idea, we were all in on it,” said Reilly Meadus, another classmate.

It wasn’t long before the boys collected over $100, and with the help of Reilly’s dad purchased a brand new scooter and helmet for Noah.

The gesture overwhelmed their teacher, but she didn’t quite know what the boys were planning initially. Two students came to her and told her the scooter was in rough shape.

“All I could think was, ‘Where are you going with this,’” McCarthy said.

That’s when they told her they bought the scooter and would like to give it to Noah in front of the school.

“I was just blown away and so impressed that this group of young men would get together and do this for Noah,” McCarthy said elatedly.

Noah was surprised at the generosity of his classmates.

“(I felt) really happy,” he said. “It felt good.”

 

  Positive news story

When asked why the boys decided to purchase a new scooter for Noah, their answer was wise beyond their years.

“We just wanted to do some good in the community,” Ryan Combden told The Compass.

It was never about the recognition, which the boys were obviously not used to. They were happy for someone to acknowledge the good deed, but not because they wanted a pat on the back.

The boys noted that news stories often involve sad situations, and in this case, they wanted to spread a little good news for a change. This was something positive.

“I think it really restores people’s faith in humanity,” Ethan Mercer said.

And Noah agreed.

“I think it’s kind of cool,” he said.

McCarthy is really proud of her students and believes they will be an inspiration to others that may want to do something nice for a classmate or friend.

All the boys agreed they want to keep doing good in their community and for those in need.

 

melissa.jenkins@tc.tc

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