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Group of protesters heading back to Muskrat Falls

Kirk Lethbridge, one of the protesters who entered the Muskrat Falls site and was on a hunger strike, was with a group that walked up the North Spur on Nov. 5 to see the Muskrat Falls for possibly the last time.
Kirk Lethbridge, one of the protesters who entered the Muskrat Falls site and was on a hunger strike, was with a group that walked up the North Spur on Nov. 5 to see the Muskrat Falls for possibly the last time.

With the possibility of the Muskrat Falls reservoir flooding to begin any day a group of protesters in Labrador are heading back up to the site

A meeting was held in Happy Valley Goose Bay on November 1, which invited Land Protectors, walkers and Labradorians to discuss the recent agreement between indigenous governments and the province over the flooding issue.

Kirk Lethbridge, one of the protesters who entered the site and undertook a hunger strike over the issue, said the meeting went great and they’re heading back up to the Muskrat Falls site.

Lethbridge said they’re going to meet tomorrow at 11:30 a.m. at the Muskrat Falls road on the north side and they’re going to walk out where they first started walking. Sunday they’re planning on going to the main gate and have a potluck dinner.

“Walking in on their site is going to be a symbol of protest,” he said. “We want the world to know we’re still here and we want Nalcor to know we haven’t given up. A few elected people may have given up but the people haven’t. The people got us where we are today and the people are going to keep on walking. This is just getting us going again, getting us back on track. Break time is over now.”

He said speaking to people at the meeting there seems to be a division between the elected leaders and the people. A lot of people are sore because they feel the leaders should have come to the people and ascertained how they felt first before coming to an agreement,” he said.

“When you got leaders telling us when we can go home now but they didn’t bring it back to us, they just made a decision for us,” he said. “People don’t want to have their elected leaders make decisions without coming back to them on such a huge issue. This is tremendously huge issue for the people in Labrador, particularly the people in the Lake Melville area.”

When the deal was reached between the province and the indigenous groups the various leaders told the protesters to go home. Lethbridge said the agreement didn’t address the issues the people had.

“We do not have full clearing of all vegetation, which is what everyone was fighting for,” he said. “We didn’t get that and we had nothing addressed on the North Spur. We’re not finished with this for sure.”

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