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Region of Queens senior gives man she’s never met more than $50,000

A Nova Scotia woman reportedly gave thousands of dollars to a man she met online.
A Nova Scotia woman reportedly gave thousands of dollars to a man she met online.

LIVERPOOL, N.S. - A woman from Queens County has given well over $50,000 to a man she communicated with on a dating site for seniors, but whom she has never met.

The information was reported to council last week in the monthly report by Kim Masland, senior safety co-ordinator for for the Region of Queens Municipality.

Masland said she had received a call from a distraught family member who believed the woman forwarded $5,000 to a man on a dating site.

Masland said she contacted the senior and the bank the senior dealt with.

“I met with the senior who truly believes the man loves her and would be coming for Christmas, which was actually only one day away,” Masland wrote in her report.

“At the end of our conversation I discovered she had sent well in excess of $50,000 to a man she had never met but believes they will be together.”

Masland said she continues to work with the woman.

Masland also reported a second online dating scam. She said she received a call from a 73-year-old woman who had been communicating with a man who presented himself as 75 and from New Zealand.

“After much time he asked for her telephone number,” Masland reported. “The man started to text her. He then called her and she immediately realized he was very young and spoke with a Caribbean accent.”

The woman ended contact with the man, without losing any money, but reported the incident to the seniors safety co-ordinator to warn others

Tips for avoiding online dating fraud

Queens RCMP Const. Rob James says people should always abandon any plans for dating when a person starts asking for money.

“In this case it was a widow, who obviously you live with somebody that long, they pass, you’re going to be pretty lonely,” he said in a phone interview March 2.

James says online scammers are very well versed in figuring out people’s vulnerabilities and telling them exactly what they want to hear.

-       “Even if you’re on a legitimate dating site, be careful, because it is still an avenue for scam artists to get in there. And these people are very slick; they’re going to tell you what you want to hear. Go in it with the thought in mind that I could get scammed, and carefully vet any information you’re given.”

-       When people start to ask for money, the red flag should pop up, James says. “It’s usually when they’re in a bind, they went to a foreign country to work, and they can’t get out, their visa has expired. Ask yourself would their company actually just abandon them like that?”

-       If a potential date asks for money, James says, consider it a scam. “If they are really that committed to a potential relationship, they’re going to come visit you first. They’re going to want to meet you face to face. If they’re reluctant to do that, then your radar should be going up.”

The information was reported to council last week in the monthly report by Kim Masland, senior safety co-ordinator for for the Region of Queens Municipality.

Masland said she had received a call from a distraught family member who believed the woman forwarded $5,000 to a man on a dating site.

Masland said she contacted the senior and the bank the senior dealt with.

“I met with the senior who truly believes the man loves her and would be coming for Christmas, which was actually only one day away,” Masland wrote in her report.

“At the end of our conversation I discovered she had sent well in excess of $50,000 to a man she had never met but believes they will be together.”

Masland said she continues to work with the woman.

Masland also reported a second online dating scam. She said she received a call from a 73-year-old woman who had been communicating with a man who presented himself as 75 and from New Zealand.

“After much time he asked for her telephone number,” Masland reported. “The man started to text her. He then called her and she immediately realized he was very young and spoke with a Caribbean accent.”

The woman ended contact with the man, without losing any money, but reported the incident to the seniors safety co-ordinator to warn others

Tips for avoiding online dating fraud

Queens RCMP Const. Rob James says people should always abandon any plans for dating when a person starts asking for money.

“In this case it was a widow, who obviously you live with somebody that long, they pass, you’re going to be pretty lonely,” he said in a phone interview March 2.

James says online scammers are very well versed in figuring out people’s vulnerabilities and telling them exactly what they want to hear.

-       “Even if you’re on a legitimate dating site, be careful, because it is still an avenue for scam artists to get in there. And these people are very slick; they’re going to tell you what you want to hear. Go in it with the thought in mind that I could get scammed, and carefully vet any information you’re given.”

-       When people start to ask for money, the red flag should pop up, James says. “It’s usually when they’re in a bind, they went to a foreign country to work, and they can’t get out, their visa has expired. Ask yourself would their company actually just abandon them like that?”

-       If a potential date asks for money, James says, consider it a scam. “If they are really that committed to a potential relationship, they’re going to come visit you first. They’re going to want to meet you face to face. If they’re reluctant to do that, then your radar should be going up.”

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