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Salmon Festival remains in the red

The comedic antics of Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers had the crowd laughing.
The comedic antics of Buddy Wasisname and the Other Fellers had the crowd laughing.

GRAND FALLS-WINDSOR, N.L. — The feeling of community pride and economic activity generated by the 2016 Exploit’s Salmon Festival trumps the $57,905 net financial deficit, in the opinion of the Grand Falls-Windsor town council at least.

This year’s festival, the 32nd annual, had total revenue of $276,365 including admission and sponsorship.

Expenses came in at $334,270.

“For the free events, for the community pride that’s built again and the economic spin-off … it was a good, if not great festival this year,” said Mayor Barry Manuel.

“The success of this year’s festival will bode well for future festivals,” he added. “We will continue to see the Salmon Festival in a positive situation in the future as well.”

Councillor Peggy Bartlett presented the report to fellow councillors noting that the entire breakdown of financial information such as ticket sales is available to those who wish to review them.

Bartlett added she didn’t receive, “one negative comment,” about this year’s festival.

“There’s nothing that punches the heart better than someone — especially someone from a neighbouring community — saying they’re so proud of Grand Falls-Windsor, so proud of the community and how it presented itself and what it has to offer,” Bartlett added.

The labour report from this year’s festival noted the creation of 105 casual positions and a total payroll of $43,130.

An additional $4,000 was paid out to community groups such as the Boy Scouts, Ground Search and Rescue and the South and Central Health Foundation.

It was also noted that the Fort McMurray Benefit staged as part of this year’s Festival raised $6,916 that will be added to the $5,000 council previously committed.

Town council instituted changes to the Festival this year after coming under fire in relation to poor financial performance in the past, to the tune of more than $1.14 million in losses to taxpayers.

This year’s festival, the 32nd annual, had total revenue of $276,365 including admission and sponsorship.

Expenses came in at $334,270.

“For the free events, for the community pride that’s built again and the economic spin-off … it was a good, if not great festival this year,” said Mayor Barry Manuel.

“The success of this year’s festival will bode well for future festivals,” he added. “We will continue to see the Salmon Festival in a positive situation in the future as well.”

Councillor Peggy Bartlett presented the report to fellow councillors noting that the entire breakdown of financial information such as ticket sales is available to those who wish to review them.

Bartlett added she didn’t receive, “one negative comment,” about this year’s festival.

“There’s nothing that punches the heart better than someone — especially someone from a neighbouring community — saying they’re so proud of Grand Falls-Windsor, so proud of the community and how it presented itself and what it has to offer,” Bartlett added.

The labour report from this year’s festival noted the creation of 105 casual positions and a total payroll of $43,130.

An additional $4,000 was paid out to community groups such as the Boy Scouts, Ground Search and Rescue and the South and Central Health Foundation.

It was also noted that the Fort McMurray Benefit staged as part of this year’s Festival raised $6,916 that will be added to the $5,000 council previously committed.

Town council instituted changes to the Festival this year after coming under fire in relation to poor financial performance in the past, to the tune of more than $1.14 million in losses to taxpayers.

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