Tropical Storm Brett track and latest forecast

The Atlantic is active with a tropical storm and another tropical wave. A tropical storm has developed in the Atlantic as of 4 p.m. Monday. Fred has sustained winds of 40 mph and is moving west at 17 mph. Tropical-Storm-Storm winds extend outward up to 45 miles from the center. It is forecast to continue to strengthen and could become a Category 1 hurricane by Wednesday afternoon. It is then expected to move across the Lesser Antilles as a tropical storm on Thursday. Dry air and wind shear are expected to impact Brett. Brett deals with dry air. It gets caught in a storm. You can see the plumes of clouds in the outer bands of the storm. Dry Saharan dust also moves close to the system, but it is over much warmer water. There is uncertainty in Brett’s long-range forecast track, but the National Hurricane Center (NHC) is forecasting the Lesser Antilles, Puerto Rico and the. The Virgin Islands should monitor the system closely and have a plan in place. Meanwhile, there is another tropical wave the NHC is tracking. They offer a medium chance of tropical development over the next couple of days. The current is located several hundred miles south-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. A tropical depression may develop over the next few days as this system moves westward at 20 mph across the eastern and central tropical Atlantic. A tropical wave moves W at 10-15 mph. It is forecast to turn northward in the Atlantic before reaching the Lesser Antilles. It is unusual for storms to form in the Atlantic in June. June storms typically form along the Gulf, Caribbean, or US East Coast. However, the waters in the Atlantic are warmer than normal. Meanwhile, tropical development is not expected in the Gulf of Mexico. Stay tuned to WDSU for the latest news from the tropics this hurricane season.

The Atlantic is active with a tropical storm and another tropical wave that may develop.

As of 4pm on Monday, Tropical Storm Brett has formed in the Atlantic.

Brett has sustained winds of 40 mph and is moving west at 17 mph. Tropical-storm-force winds extend outward up to 45 miles from the center.

It is forecast to continue to strengthen and become a Category 1 hurricane by Wednesday afternoon. It is then expected to move across the Lesser Antilles as a tropical storm on Thursday. Dry air and wind shear are expected to impact Brett.

Brett deals with dry air. It gets caught in a storm. You can see the plumes of clouds in the outer bands of the storm. Dry Saharan dust also moves closer to the system, but it is in much warmer water.

Brett’s long-range forecast track remains uncertain, but the National Hurricane Center (NHC) advises everyone in the Lesser Antilles, Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands to keep a close eye on the system and have a plan.

Meanwhile, there is another tropical wave the NHC is tracking. They offer a medium chance of tropical development over the next couple of days. The current is located several hundred miles south-southwest of the Cape Verde Islands. A tropical depression may develop over the next few days as this system moves westward at 20 mph across the eastern and central tropical Atlantic.

A tropical wave moves W at 10-15 mph. It is forecast to turn northward in the Atlantic before reaching the Lesser Antilles.

It is unusual for storms to form in the Atlantic in June. June storms typically form along the Gulf, Caribbean, or US East Coast. However, the waters in the Atlantic are warmer than normal.

Meanwhile, tropical development is not expected in the Gulf of Mexico.

Stay tuned to WDSU for the latest news from the tropics this hurricane season.

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